Roberts Law Group, PLLC
North Carolina Criminal Defense Attorneys
We FIGHT for the Best Results
We FIGHT for the Best Results

Posts tagged "Supreme Court decision"

Supreme Court upholds double-jeopardy exception: What it means for Trump associates

The double jeopardy clause is one of the foundations of our criminal justice system. The Fifth Amendment guarantees that you can't be prosecuted twice for the same offense. If you're charged with a crime and a jury finds you not guilty, the prosecution doesn't get another shot. Without this protection, the prosecution could simply keep coming after you, and your right to a fair trial would be rendered worthless.

Supreme Court: Prosecution's pattern of race-based jury selection is unconstitutional

In a case that spans decades, a black Mississippi man was convicted four times for the 1996 murders of four furniture store employees - three white, one black. Four times, he was sentenced to death.

Supreme Court strikes down warrantless search of motorcycle in driveway

Privacy rights are at the heart of a free society. The Fourth Amendment provides valuable protection against unreasonable government intrusion. Police can't break down your door for no reason. They can't search your belongings without justification. They can't arrest you on a whim.

Supreme Court Votes in Favor of First Amendment, Against North Carolina's Ban on Social Media

"In sum, to foreclose access to social media altogether is to prevent the user from engaging in the legitimate exercise of First Amendment rights."

Your Cheek Cells Are No Longer Your Own After An Arrest

The U.S. Supreme Court announced its decision this week in Maryland v. King, allowing law enforcement officers around the country to take a cheek swab after an arrest for a serious crime. Cheek cells contain a person's DNA, which can then be used to determine whether an arrested person can be tied to open, unsolved crimes through CODIS. And, that DNA information can possibly be stored forever.

8th Amendment May Mean New Sentencing Hearing For Juveniles

The U.S. Supreme Court decided last year that the 8th Amendment's prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment means that juvenile crimes cannot be punished by a life sentence with no chance of parole. For Laurence Lovette, formerly of Durham, that he will have a second chance to prove to a judge that he should not spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Supreme Court To Consider Search And Seizure Issues In November

On the docket this November, the Supreme Court of the United States is set to consider several issues related to the Fourth Amendment, search and seizure and criminal defense.

Collecting DNA From The Accused In North Carolina

We blogged earlier this week about the U.S. Supreme Court potentially weighing in next session on whether law enforcement can collect DNA samples from people who are arrested and accused of a crime before he or she is actually convicted. North Carolina law currently allows law enforcement to do just that - take a DNA sample once you're arrested.

Accused But Not Convicted? Hands Off My DNA!

Alonzo King was arrested for assault in 2009. Under Maryland's DNA Collection Act, law enforcement took a DNA sample from him without a warrant. The Act allows police to collect DNA samples from anyone arrested for (not convicted of) certain felony charges, including burglary, attempted burglary, a violent crime or an attempt at a violent crime.

No More Mandatory Life Without Parole For People Under Age 18

Anyone under the age of 18, whether tried as a juvenile or adult, who is convicted of murder can no longer be sentenced to life without parole without consideration being given to his or her age and the nature of the crime. The Supreme Court recently held, in Miller v. Alabama, that mandatory life sentences without parole for juvenile offenders violate the 8th Amendment's prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment.

Client Reviews

Get Legal Help Now
Let Us Help You

Put our team of criminal defense lawyers on your side today. You are one phone call or email away from getting your questions answered by an experienced defense attorney.

Call us at 877-880-5753 to set up a free consultation or send us an email.

Fill out the form below for a Free Consultation.

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Call 877-880-5753 to schedule a free initial consultation.
Offices open weekdays 8am - 7pm, Saturdays 9am - 5pm